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Glen Doll

Where we are

Latest forest information

  • We are carrying out repair works to forest roads leading to Corrie Fee, and the forest road leading to Bachnagairn via Moulzie. Works should start during the week commencing 19 September for approximately two weeks. To facilitate safe access for visitors through these worksites, the access points will be managed by staff. As such there may be short delays for visitors using these routes.
  • Glen Doll car park and the Corrie Fee Trail are open. All other Forestry and Land Scotland waymarked trails remain closed due to storm damage. 
  • Mountain access routes update: Kilbo path is open, Corrie Fee Path is open, Dounalt Road is open (south side of upper White Water - this is an alternative for Jocks road, which remains closed). 
  • Works to clear windblown trees from alongside the road to Bachnagairn at Moulzie are ongoing. This road is open but please take care when passing the worksite. 
  • The Capel Road Track is blocked with trees at OS Grid Ref: NO 2841 7717. This may be bypassed by walking along the forest boundary wall between NO 2834 7763 to NO 2872 7771. Conditions on this alternative route are steep, rocky and rough underfoot.

About

Wander through the glen, past alpine wildflowers

There’s something for everyone at Glen Doll. Picnic beside the South Esk burn, choose from six scenic trails or head for the amazing natural amphitheatre at Corrie Fee, a National Nature Reserve.

The trails meander beside rushing burns in the valley floor or climb through the woods to breathtaking viewpoints. Watch for climbers exploring the craggy valley sides, golden eagles circling overhead and rare alpine plants that arrived here during the last Ice Age.

Walking trails

Walking

South Esk Trail (closed)

A trail notice is in effect

This trail is closed due to storm damage.

A magical walk beside the babbling River South Esk. There are great views up into the hills and a chance to see dippers and grey wagtail in the stream.  

Sections of uneven grassy and earthy path with narrow, rocky and muddy parts. Short fairly steep slopes with rough stone steps. Includes one bridge and a section along the road.

Moderate trail grade icon
2 miles / 3.4 km

Allow
1 hour

More information

Don't forget to look up when the trail opens out at the top of Glen Clova – if you're lucky, you may spot golden eagles circling overhead.

Walking

White Water Trail (closed)

A trail notice is in effect

This trail is closed due to storm damage.

Walk alongside the rushing White Water, which can froth with foam at certain times of year as meltwater pours down from the Cairngorms.

Uneven gravel surface with some narrow, grassy and potentially muddy sections. Some short fairly steep slopes. 

Moderate trail grade icon
2 ½ miles / 3.9 km

Allow
1½ hours

More information

Listen for flocks of siskins twittering in the forest canopy and watch out for red squirrels and roe deer amongst the pines.

Walking

Corrie Fee Trail

Head into the heart of nature’s amphitheatre to be surrounded by alpine landscape and flowers.

Firm but uneven gravel surface. Continuous slope for ¾ mile with some fairly steep sections. Includes narrow bridge and uneven rocky steps leading up to viewing area. 

Moderate trail grade icon
4 ¼ miles / 6.9 km

Allow
2½ hours

More information

There's a real wow factor when you arrive at the great bowl of Corrie Fee, a vast amphitheatre carved out of the hillside by glaciers. Although the ice is long gone, plants still grow here that thrive in an arctic climate. Look out for purple coltsfoot clinging to the corrie's craggy slopes – this is the only place in Britain where it grows.

Corrie Fee is one of the Cairngorms National Park's National Nature Reserves because of its remarkable geology, wildlife and rare arctic alpine plants. Signal posts along the route will tell you more of its remarkable story.

From the entrance to Corrie Fee you can continue into the reserve and onto the plateau of the Cairngorm Mountains. This longer route is 6 miles (10 km): allow 4 hours.

Walking

Dounalt Trail (closed)

A trail notice is in effect

This trail is closed due to storm damage.

Follow the course of the White Water through colourful larch forest for some breathtaking views up Glen Doll and a chance to glimpse red deer.

Uneven but generally wide gravel surface, with rough rocky and muddy parts. Some fairly steep slopes. Includes one bridge with steps and a few shallow fords. 

Moderate trail grade icon
5 ¼ miles / 8.3 km

Allow
3 hours

More information

This trail follows part of Jock's Road, an ancient sheep-droving route to Braemar on Deeside that was also popular with cattle rustlers and whisky smugglers!

Watch out for red deer on the craggy slopes above you – in autumn you may hear the stags roaring as they challenge each other for a mate.

Activities

Bag a Munro or two

Glen Doll is a popular starting point for hill walks to two Munros called Dreish and Mayar. These routes are suitable for experienced and well-equipped walkers only – check our advice about hillwalking before you set off.

Facilities and access

Walking
Walking
Toilets
Toilets
Parking (charge)
Parking (charge)
Viewpoint
Viewpoint
Picnic area
Picnic area

Life’s essentials

There are toilets available on site managed by Angusalive Ranger Service, or alternatively the nearest toilets and places to eat are in Clova village.

Car parking information

The charge to park at Glen Doll is £3 for the day for cars, or £10 for a minibus or coach.

Payment options: Coin or RingGo

Blue badge holders park free in this car park. Please park with care and consideration. In particular please park in designated parking areas only and do not block entrances or gates. Nearby car parks with free parking can be found in our local forest list without the £ symbol. 

Annual parking passes available:

Blue Badge Holders:

The Tay & Tentsmuir pass above is available to Blue Badge holders for £20 (which covers the electronic parking pass for the Tentsmuir barrier). 

More parking info

Ranger Service

The Angusalive Ranger Service has a base at Glen Doll car park, full of fascinating information about the glen. Staff are here most days to help you get the best out of your visit. The rangers also run a regular series of special events.

Telephone: 01575 550233 Email: GlenDollRanger@angusalive.scot

Getting here

Take the B955 north from Kirriemuir to the head of Glen Clova, then follow the minor road to Glen Doll car park. 

Using SatNav?

DD8 4RD is the closest postcode.

Public transport

There is a limited postbus service to Clova village from Kirriemuir, operating daily except Sundays.

Get directions

Get in touch

Have a question or suggestion for improvement?

Phone
0300 067 6380 (option 1)
More contact information

Nearby forests

Trees beside loch at Cambus o'May

Classic Deeside scenery of pine, heather and blaeberry

Facilities and activities
Walking
Walking
Parking icon
Parking
Viewpoint
Viewpoint
Picnic area
Picnic area
Distance from 'Glen Doll': 14.47 miles
Trees beside loch at Cambus o'May

Classic Deeside scenery of pine, heather and blaeberry

Facilities and activities
Walking
Walking
Parking icon
Parking
Viewpoint
Viewpoint
Picnic area
Picnic area
Distance from 'Glen Doll': 14.47 miles
Aerial view through broad leaf trees of a valley full of fields and trees turning orange for autumn, in the back is a chain of hills

Look for hidden sculptures in this hillside wood

Facilities and activities
Walking
Walking
Parking icon
Parking
Viewpoint
Viewpoint
Distance from 'Glen Doll': 23.93 miles