Roseisle

Where we are

Cycle forest trails or relax on sandy beaches

A great place to visit for a fun-filled family day out. Bring a picnic, or cook up a barbecue while the children have fun in the play area. Relax on the sandy beach, explore the sweet-smelling pinewood or watch out for local wildlife from our bird hide. There's so much to do here, you'll keep coming back...

There is history here, too. A series of defence structures were built between Cullen Bay and Burghead Bay, through today's Roseisle and Lossie forests. On the beach at Roseisle you’ll find remnants of the anti-tank blocks and pillboxes.

If you want to find out more about the area’s coastal defences, head to the coastal forests at Lossie and Culbin. The pinewoods at Culbin are also a great place to walk, cycle or ride.

Our guide to Moray's forests

Walking trails

Walking

Ice House Trail

This short path leads you through the forest just in from the shore to a grassy knoll beside the Bessie Burn with spectacular views to sea. See if you can spot the old ice house along the trail.

An undulating, moderately steep track, with some short fairly steep sections. Generally loose and sandy, or earthy paths which can be muddy after rain. Uneven sections with exposed tree roots.

Moderate
1 ¼ miles / 2.0 km

Allow
¾ hour

More information

See if you can spot the old ice house along the trail, used for storing salmon caught off the coast. Keep an eye on the horizon too – this coastline was once the haunt of smugglers!

Walking

Millie Bothy

A stroll through this lovely coastal pine forest, taking in an old fishermen's bothy and the sparkling Millie Burn.

A loose sandy or earthy uneven path. Generally gentle to moderately steep, with some short fairly steep slopes. One long flight of steep, uneven log steps. Wet and muddy after rain.

Strenuous
1 ½ miles / 2.6 km

Allow
1¼ hours

More information

Discover the forest at different stages in its life, from newly-planted trees to mature pines. This scenic trail leads you past ruined Millie Bothy, where salmon fishermen used to take shelter, and heads to the Millie Burn where it enters the sea for great views across the Moray Firth.

Walking

Wildlife Walk Trail

A great circuit that takes in forest and foreshore, with a chance to spot seals, red squirrels and woodland birds.

A narrow loose and sandy or earthy uneven surface. Can be wet after rain. Generally gentle to moderately steep, with short fairly steep slopes. One narrow bridge.

Strenuous
2 ½ miles / 4.2 km

Allow
1¾ hours

More information

Look out for seals and seabirds bobbing offshore, red squirrels as you walk amongst the trees and woodpeckers and other woodland birds from the hide. See if you can spot the old ice house along the trail and take time to pause at the bridge, watching your reflection in the clear water of the Bessie Burn.

Activities

Cycling

There are no waymarked cycle trails here, but there are plenty of flat routes that make this a great place to explore by bike. You can also cycle in from Burghead and College of Roseisle.

Horse riding

There are no waymarked horse riding routes, but it’s well worth exploring this beautiful coastal pinewood on horseback. The wood is crisscrossed with quiet, little-used tracks and trails. Find out more in our horse riding section.

Trails to Roseisle

Waymarked walks from the car park link with the villages of Burghead and College of Roseisle. These have been developed in partnership with the Burghead Footpath Group.

Discover Roseisle’s wartime story

Access the beach to see the World War II coastal defences, including concrete tank cubes and pill boxes. Many of the blocks have moved from their original positions, due to the shifting sands, but they still provide excellent defence against the wind here.

Facilities & access

Toilets
Toilets
Parking (charge)
Parking (charge)
Play area
Play area
Barbeque
Barbeque
Picnic area
Picnic area

Life’s essentials

The toilets here are seasonal and are open from 1 April to 31 October.

There are picnic tables dotted throughout the trees near the car park and some purpose-built barbecues on site, available to anyone on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Alternatively, bring your own disposable barbecue – there are ceramic tiles on some of the picnic tables to stand them on.

There is play equipment, suitable for children of all ages, close to the picnic area. You can find refreshments and shops at the nearby towns of Kinloss, Elgin and Burghead. You’ll also find public toilets that are open year-round at Burghead and Findhorn.

Car parking charges

Please note, parking charges are as follows:

  • £1 for up to 1 hour
  • £1.50 for up to 3 hours
  • £2 for all day
  • £8 for minibus and coach all day

Season passes are also available. For more information please contact us.

Getting here

From Forres: Turn off the A96 onto the B9011 to Kinloss, then the B9089 to Burghead. Look out for the car park on the left after 6 miles (10km).

From Elgin: Turn off the A96 onto the B9013 to Burghead. At College of Roseisle turn left and follow the signs. The car park is on the right after 2 miles (3km).

Using SatNav?

IV36 2UB is the nearest postcode.

Public transport

Elgin is the nearest railway station. There are regular buses from Elgin to Roseisle. You’ll find service details at Traveline Scotland.

Get directions

Get in touch

Have a question or suggestion for improvement?

Phone
0300 067 6200
More contact information

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